Breakfast time is my favorite time of day. But I typically wake up feeling ready to eat or are eating after working out. So I don’t want to spend a lot of time making food. And I know for a lot of people, mornings are rushed and food is grabbed on the way out the door. Baked oatmeal is yummy and easy to make. I modified this baked oatmeal recipe from The Oh She Glows Cookbook. It really is one of those recipes you can make ahead of time and heat up within seconds in the morning.

Serving size for Baked oatmeal

Baked oatmeal stays together so nicely! 

Serving Size for Apple-Pie Baked Oatmeal

As I was cutting me a piece, I was thinking about how much I should put into my bowl. I honestly wasn’t exactly sure how much would be classified as a serving size. Which, triggered the thought that I don’t need to know how much baked oatmeal is a certain amount of calories but I do need to know how much would leave me feeling satisfied and energized for my morning.

How are serving sizes determined?

Recorded serving sizes developed in 1994 when nutrition labeling on packages became standardized. The U.S. Department of Agriculture surveyed Americans and used two previous Nationwide Health and Nutrition Examination Survey to identify how much the average American over the age of four consumed in a single seating.  Recently, new survey data is being used to create new serving sizes on food products. The new food label that will be required in 2018 is adjusting serving sizes to more closely reflect the amounts of food people are currently eating. 

What is and is not a serving size?

But let’s click pause for a moment and discuss what a serving size actually is and what it is not. A serving size is a measurement that allows food companies to offer information about the food they are selling. It allows the consumer to know what they are eating. The USDA also created these standards to develop and establish some guidelines. I think that’s worth repeating. A serving size is a measurement that allows for accurate representation of what is in a container of food. A serving size is not directly associated with any health measurement. Serving sizes are not based off proven science. They are not rules that you have to follow in order to be healthy. It is an industry regulation tool to regulate food manufactures.

So, how much should I eat?

A food manufacturer, the FDA, a diet plan, or an online blog cannot tell you this. YOU are the best person to decide how much you eat. I hear you when you say, “that doesn’t sound right because I’m such and such weight and I got here because of how much I eat”. Which makes sense that we feel that way because our culture of looking a certain way, following diet plans, and disordered eating has disrupted our ability to determine how much food our bodies need. Somewhere along the line we are taught to gauge our serving sizes on external cues instead of internal cues.

Using Portion Sizes

Another word that better reflects your personal need is portion sizes. A portion size is the amount of food you decide to eat. You have total control over your portion sizes. Serving sizes can be helpful in helping us learn to identify internal cues. They can be helpful in providing us with some understanding of what we are eating. But your internal cues should be at the heart of identifying your portion sizes.

For example, with this baked oatmeal. I served a portion onto my plate that seemed reasonable but upon finishing that amount, I was still hungry. I knew I couldn’t run around with Emmett, do well on my finals, or feel like my best self if I had just stuck to that serving size.

Reconnecting with Your Inner Guide

Listening to your body takes practice and a little bit of trial and error. And since your body changes, it’s a life long journey of listening and reconnecting with it. Reconnecting can mean a new way of thinking. It may mean replacing negative words with positive phrases and replacing external cues with internal cues. For example, after eating would be a good time to check-in with what your body is telling you, not what your mind is telling you. How did the food item make your body feel? Do you feel energized or sluggish? What about satisfaction? Or do certain foods make your stomach feel upset and uncomfortable?

I previously posted about dessert, which also talked about trusting your body, and the hunger scale. I hope that some of these tools that have helped me reconnect with my internal cues can help you.

 

Print Recipe
Apple-Pie Baked Oatmeal
Baked oatmeal is one of my favorite breakfasts. You can make it ahead of time or make in a muffin tin to have oatmeal-on-the-go. If you'd like to change it up, replace the apples with a different fruit, like 1.5 cups of blueberries, or 2 large ripe bananas.
Serving size for Baked oatmeal
Course Breakfast
Cuisine Vegetarian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Course Breakfast
Cuisine Vegetarian
Prep Time 20 minutes
Cook Time 35 minutes
Servings
servings
Ingredients
Serving size for Baked oatmeal
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Lightly grease a 2-quart casserole dish or 12-cup muffin tin.
  2. In a large bowl, mix together the oats, sugar, cinnamon, and baking powder.
  3. In a another large bowl, stir together the milk, applesauce, and vanilla.
  4. Pour the liquid mixture over the dry mixture. Stir until well combined. You'll notice the mixture has a little foamy texture to it.
  5. Fold in the chopped apples.
  6. Pour the mixture into your prepared dish and smooth out the top. Sprinkle with your nuts (if using).
  7. Bake, uncovered, for 35 minutes or until the apples are tender.
  8. Cool for 5 to 10 minutes before serving .
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